Nano News & Events

Eco-friendly waterborne semiconductor inks using surfactant

InterNano Industry News - December 1, 2017 - 4:45am
Researchers have developed a technology to produce environmentally friendly water-borne semiconductor inks using surfactant. The result is expected to be applied to various electronic devices with a semiconductor surface control technique.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Graphene Circuits Printed onto Fabric Can Survive 20 Washes - Controlled Environments Magazine

InterNano Industry News - December 1, 2017 - 4:45am
Graphene Circuits Printed onto Fabric Can Survive 20 WashesControlled Environments MagazineResearchers have successfully incorporated washable, stretchable, and breathable electronic circuits into fabric, opening up new possibilities for smart textiles and wearable electronics. The circuits were made with cheap, safe, and environmentally ...and more »
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Ultra-thin graphene-based encapsulation for OLEDs

InterNano Industry News - December 1, 2017 - 4:45am
Researchers have reported on improved performance of graphene-based moisture barrier layers. By combining catalytic CVD and ALD they created in scalable fashion nanolaminates of few-layer graphene and aluminium oxid. Unlike previous reports, this new approach exploits the synergy between different materials and growth techniques. These nanolaminates also are a potential material to be included in standard multi-stacked barrier layers to enhance the performance of existing ALD aluminium oxide and produce next generation moisture barriers.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

University of Illinois Turns to Tektronix to Outfit Nanofabrication Lab - PR Newswire (press release)

InterNano Industry News - December 1, 2017 - 4:45am
University of Illinois Turns to Tektronix to Outfit Nanofabrication LabPR Newswire (press release)BEAVERTON, Ore., Oct. 17, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Tektronix, Inc., a leading worldwide provider of measurement solutions, today announced that the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has ...and more »
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Joey Mead Named Distinguished University Professor - UMass Lowell

InterNano Industry News - December 1, 2017 - 4:45am
UMass LowellJoey Mead Named Distinguished University ProfessorUMass LowellMead is a research dynamo, with a productive career in materials science, polymer engineering and nanomanufacturing,” notes Prof. David Kazmer, chair of the department. “Her research productivity is outstanding, as documented by scholarly publications, ...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Cheaper, more flexible and eco-friendly smartphone screens with graphene

InterNano Industry News - December 1, 2017 - 4:45am
New 'potato stamp' technique combining silver and graphene may create cheaper, more flexible and eco-friendly screens.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

New OECD Test Guidelines for nanomaterials

InterNano Industry News - December 1, 2017 - 4:45am
The OECD has released a first set of Test Guidelines developed specifically for nanomaterials, in response to their increased production and usage.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Gov. Baker Awards UMass Amherst $500000 to Support Continued Research in Manufacturing Flexible Hybrid ... - UMass News and Media Relations

InterNano Industry News - December 1, 2017 - 4:45am
Gov. Baker Awards UMass Amherst $500000 to Support Continued Research in Manufacturing Flexible Hybrid ...UMass News and Media RelationsThe M2I2 grant supports continuing work by Watkins, director of the Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing, a nanomanufacturing research center that works with manufacturers to finish their processes and products such as roll-to-roll printed flexible ...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

A flexible new platform for high-performance electronics

InterNano Industry News - December 1, 2017 - 4:45am
Engineers has created the most functional flexible transistor in the world - and with it, a fast, simple and inexpensive fabrication process that's easily scalable to the commercial level.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

UML Nanomanufacturing Center and Raytheon Partner on Flexible Hybrid Electronics Manufacturing - UMass Lowell

InterNano Industry News - December 1, 2017 - 4:45am
UMass LowellUML Nanomanufacturing Center and Raytheon Partner on Flexible Hybrid Electronics ManufacturingUMass LowellNanomanufacturing Center postdoctoral researcher Erin Keaney and plastics engineering senior Stephen Burbine work with the center's continuous, roll-to-roll flexible substrate printer at the Saab Emerging Technologies and Innovation Center on North ...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

U of Illinois, NCSA Launch First US Nanomanufacturing Node - HPCwire (blog)

InterNano Industry News - December 1, 2017 - 4:45am
HPCwire (blog)U of Illinois, NCSA Launch First US Nanomanufacturing NodeHPCwire (blog)The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign together with the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) have launched the United States's first computational node aimed at the development of nanomanufacturing simulation tools.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Patent for one-of-a-kind process exfoliating pure graphene

InterNano Industry News - December 1, 2017 - 4:45am
Researchers have patented a one-of-a-kind process for exfoliating graphene in its pure (unoxidized) form, as well as manufacturing innovative graphene nanocomposites that have potential uses in a variety of applications.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

A nanotechnology approach to purifying liquid crystals

InterNano Industry News - December 1, 2017 - 4:45am
Liquid crystals used in modern devices such as laptops, tablets and smartphones typically contain a small fraction of ionic contaminants. These ion contaminants can originate from multiple sources during the chemical synthesis of materials, in the process of assembling the device, and in its daily use. In the case of LCDs, mobile ions in liquid crystals lead to such undesirable effects as image sticking, image flickering, and slow response. A promising solution to reduce the concentration of mobile ions in liquid crystal devices can be found by merging liquid crystals and nanotechnology.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Molybdenum-Disulfide 2D Transistors Go Ballistic

InterNano Industry News - December 1, 2017 - 4:45am
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> 2D nanomaterial pulls ahead with working registers and latch circuits and devices that let electrons zip through unimpeded Image: Stanford University Molybdenum disulfide, a two dimensional semiconductor that’s just 3 atoms thick, has had a big year. In October, a group of researchers made a 1-nanometer transistor from the material, showing that even if silicon transistors stop shrinking, the new material might provide a path forward. In December, at the IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting in San Francisco, researchers presented work they say shows that molybdenum disulfide not only makes for superlative single transistors, but can be made into complex circuits using realistic manufacturing methods. At the meeting, a group from Stanford showed that transistors made from large sheets of MoS2 can be used to make transistors with 10-nanometer-long, gate having electronic properties that approach the material’s theoretical limits. The devices displayed traits close to ballistic conduction, a state of very low electrical resistance that allows the unimpeded flow of charge over relatively long distances—a phenomenon that should lead to speedy circuits. Separately, a team from MIT demonstrated complex circuit elements made from MoS2 transistors. Most of the work on molybdenum disulfide so far has been what Stanford electrical engineer Eric Pop calls “Powerpoint devices.” These one-off devices, made by hand in the lab, have terrific performance that looks great in a slide. This step is an important one, says Pop, but the 2D material is now maturing. Image: Stanford University The Stanford lab’s transistors are not as small as the record-breaking ones demonstrated in October. What’s significant, says group leader Pop, is that these latest transistors maintained similar performance even though they were made using more industrial-type techniques. Instead of using Scotch tape to peel off a layer of molybdenum disulfide from a rock of the material, then carefully placing it down and crafting one transistor at a time, Pop’s grad student started by growing a large sheet of the material on a wafer of silicon. In a transistor, a gate electrode switches the semiconductor channel between conducting and insulating states. In the Stanford device, the tricky part was coming up with an easy way to make a small gate atop the molybdenum disulfide without harming it, says Pop. That is, until his student, Christopher English, realized they could harness the power of rust. English chose a somewhat unusual material, aluminum, to serve as the gate electrode. He deposited a 20-nanometer finger of aluminum on the molybdenum, then allowed it to oxidize and shrink down to a smaller size. The gate ends up being about 10 nanometers. At these relatively small dimensions, the molybdenum disulfide transistors approach their ultimate electrical limit, a state called ballistic conduction. When a device is small enough (or at low enough temperature), electrons will travel through the conducting medium without scattering because of collisions with the atoms that make up the material. Transistors operating ballistically should switch very fast and enable high-performance processors. Pop estimates that about 1 in 5 electrons moves though the rusty transistors ballistically. By further improving the quality of the material (or making the transistors smaller), he expects that ratio to improve. The important thing, he says, is the way they achieved this: using methods that could translate to larger scales. “We have all the ingredients we need to scale this up,” says Pop. Zippy nanoscale transistors are great on their own, but they’re useful only if you can build them into circuits.  Researchers from MIT demonstrated just that by constructing working registers and latches. They managed the feat, says electrical engineer Dina El-Damak, by creating computer-aided design software tailored to MoS2. This sort of software is common in the silicon world and enables designers to come up with new circuits relatively easily. (El-Damak worked on the molybdenum disulfide project at MIT and is now a professor at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles.) Since molybdenum disulfide is so new, not many circuit designers have worked with the material. So far, most work has been done by trial and error, one device at a time. The MIT group can create an informed circuit design, using their computer models to simulate the best and worst cases, based on the material’s known properties and the performance of previous devices, says El-Damak. Then the group fabricates the design that seems most likely to work, tests its performance, and feeds the results back into the program. “By doing this, we have more confidence in scaling up this technology,” she says. Both Pop and El-Damak say molybdenum disulfide is unlikely to be a direct replacement for silicon. The material will either be used to build complementary systems on top of silicon chips, or it will be used on its own in flexible, transparent electronics. It’s also possible that some other 2D semiconductor will end up being a better option. Molybdenum disulfide is a few steps ahead because researchers have worked with it more than, say, tungsten selenide, and know how to grow the material over large areas. The Stanford and MIT research demonstrates important progress in this field, says Deji Akinwande, an electrical engineer at the University of Texas at Austin who co-chaired the IEDM session on 1D and 2D devices. People who work in industry are always asking when these materials will be made into useful circuits, and now it’s happening, he says. “Industry is starting to take this more seriously, now that it’s no longer just the grad student in the basement working on it,” he says.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nano: a cleaner option?

InterNano Industry News - December 1, 2017 - 4:45am
Could nanotechnology tidy up the planet without leaving a dangerous residue of its own?It's likely that you've recently swirled nanotechnology down your sink. Antimicrobial silver nanoparticles, for example, are added to food containers, socks, and cleaning products such as floor polish. But could nanoparticles – measuring less than 100 nanometres wide – clean more than just your house? Could nanotechnology tidy up the planet without leaving a dangerous residue of its own?The European Environment Agency estimates that "potentially polluting activities" have occurred at nearly three million EU sites. But nanoparticles could remediate water, soil and air polluted by compounds such as heavy metals and aromatic hydrocarbons. With high reactivity and a larger surface area than the same mass of material in a larger form, nanoparticles are prime candidates for capturing and destroying pollutants. Continue reading...
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Using graphene as transparent electrodes and alignment layers for liquid crystal devices

InterNano Industry News - December 1, 2017 - 4:45am
In conventional liquid crystal displays (LCD), the liquid crystal (LC) material is contained in conventional LC cells, where the polyimide layers are used to align the LC homogeneously in the cell, and the transmissive indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes are used to apply the electric field to reorient the LC along the field. Now, researchers have experimentally demonstrated that monolayer graphene films on the two glass substrates can function concurrently as the LC alignment layers and the transparent electrodes to fabricate an LC cell, without using the conventional polyimide and ITO substrates.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Flexible sensors

InterNano Industry News - December 1, 2017 - 4:45am
Flexible sensors hold great promise for various innovative applications in fields such as medicine, healthcare, environment, and biology. Over the past decade, the development of flexible and stretchable sensors for various functions has been accelerated by rapid advances in materials, processing methods, and platforms. For practical applications, new expectations are arising in the pursuit of highly economical, multifunctional, biocompatible flexible sensors.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Self-organizing graphene nanodots

InterNano Industry News - December 1, 2017 - 4:45am
The ultimate challenge of nanotechnology is to control the structure of matter with atomic precision. The better we are at shaping and structuring material on a small scale, the more powerful technology we can dream of. Unfortunately, the atomic scale is entirely out of range for conventional patterning. Researchers now report that they have achieved nanoscale self-assembly within a two-dimensional layer. Dosing of ethylene and borazine near a hot iridium surface, leads for self-organising of a two-dimensional superlattice of graphene dots.
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Nanosheets: IBM’s Path to 5-Nanometer Transistors

InterNano Industry News - December 1, 2017 - 4:45am
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> IBM says their stacked nanosheet transistors will give circuit designers more flexibility Photo: IBM Researchers at IBM believe the future of the transistor is in stacked nanosheets. After a decade of research, most recently in partnership with Samsung and Global Foundries, the company will describe 5-nanometer node test chips based on these transistors today at the Symposium on VLSI Technology and Circuits in Kyoto. Today’s state-of-the-art transistor is the finFET, named for the fin-like ridges of current-carrying silicon that project from the chip’s surface. The silicon fins are surrounded on their three exposed sides by a structure called the gate. The gate switches the flow of current on, and prevents electrons from leaking out when the transistor is off. This design is expected to last from this year’s bleeding-edge process technology, the “10-nanometer” node, through the next node, 7 nanometers. But any smaller, and these transistors will become difficult to switch off: electrons will leak out, even with the three-sided gates. So the semiconductor industry has been working on alternatives for the upcoming 5 nanometer node. One popular idea is to use lateral silicon nanowires that are completely surrounded by the gate, preventing electron leaks and saving power. This design is called “gate all around.” IBM’s new design is a variation on this. In their test chips, each transistor is made up of three stacked horizontal sheets of silicon, each only a few nanometers thick and completely surrounded by a gate. Why a sheet instead of a wire? Huiming Bu, director of silicon integration and devices at IBM, says nanosheets can bring back one of the benefits of pre-finFET, planar designs. Designers used to be able to vary the width of a transistor to prioritize fast operations or energy efficiency. Varying the amount of silicon in a finFET transistor is not practicable because it would mean making some fins taller and other shorter. Fins must all be the same height due to manufacturing constraints, says Bu. IBM’s nanosheets can range from 8 to 50 nanometers in width. “Wider gives you better performance but takes more power, smaller width relaxes performance but reduces power use,” says Bu. This will allow circuit designers to pick and choose what they need, whether they are making a power efficient mobile chip processor or designing a bank of SRAM memory. “We are bringing flexibility back to the designers,” he says. The test chips have 30 billion transistors. The company has not benchmarked them against 7 nanometer designs, since those are not on the market. Compared to 10 nanometer chips, the new designs have a 40 percent performance enhancement at a given power; at matched performance, they can save 75 percent on power. Mukesh Khare, vice president of semiconductor technology and research at IBM, says that the company has spent years working on the process technology and materials for making stacked nanosheets. The research chips were made using electron-beam lithography—a technology too expensive for mass production. But by the time 5-nanometer chips go into production extreme-ultraviolet lithography (EUV) will be available to reduce costs, according to Khare. He says that it takes the same number of EUV lithography masks—the patterns to be projected onto to the chip to form transistor components—to make a 5-nanometer nanosheet transistor as it does to make an equivalent finFET. IBM plans to offer this technology to their customers at the 5-nanometer node. “We think this will become the prevalent structure beyond finFET,” says Khare. 
Categories: Nanotechnology News

Researchers print graphene-like materials with inkjet

InterNano Industry News - November 18, 2017 - 4:45am
New black phosphorous inks are compatible with conventional inkjet printing techniques for optoelectronics and photonics.
Categories: Nanotechnology News